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Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:52 pm
by Fairblue
Postby 266 » 25 May 2016, 03:22

Well, here it is.

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A small dissertation to follow re markings and logic. Hope you like the Pacemaker.

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:53 pm
by Fairblue
Postby 266 » 25 May 2016, 06:42

Life has been a bit hectic these few weeks - familial and pet issues interspersed with car problems and a flood through the house, plus a couple of other unexpected demands on time and money. I'm hoping it's settling down a bit. But now, with a short breathing space, I can provide the promised dissertation.

First, as mentioned earlier, the mysterious vertical bar on the rudder. No logic to it, just have to assume it was an in-house marking for Stellar Skyways.
Next, the fin flash. I have included it as the red/blue colours of Liechtenstein, since the aircraft is owned by a Liechtenstein registered company; for the same reason I have registered the aircraft with the same nationality.

Now the keen eyed will be saying: "But the nitwit has given it Swiss lettering!" And they would be right. Liechtenstein is a very small country and has delegated a number of international functions to Switzerland. Civil aviation is one of those. A Liechtenstein aircraft will have the HB- letters of Switzerland, followed by L for Liechtenstein, followed by the two letters identifying the individual aircraft. In this case those letters are ST for Stellar Tours. Post-war rules allowed for smaller lettering than prewar, and some countries didn't push the issue of wing lettering at all. I've assumed that a reduction in identification would suit Stellar Skyways, but have kept some letters for the wings in case I change my mind later.

Moving on, I come to the dragon on the nose. The early book illustration shows a dragon of sorts; the Hampton edition had a cool red dragon on the cover, but it got too hard to isolate and reduce it. I then found another image that I liked, and managed to shrink that on to decal paper. It came out well. If anyone wants this image in 1-72 or 1-48 I have a sheet of them now unused. Yours for the asking.

The model itself started as a Hobbycraft Beech C-45. I interfered with it a bit and am happy with the outcome. It looks like the Pacemaker in my imagination. Now for the WW1 group build.

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:53 pm
by Fairblue
Postby Fairblue » 25 May 2016, 08:53

You've made a grand job of this, 266. As I said earlier, I'm quite fond of this plane for some reason and I like it even better now you've finished it.

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:53 pm
by Fairblue
Postby tiffinata » 25 May 2016, 10:47

That is so beautiful.

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:53 pm
by Fairblue
Postby kylie_koyote » 25 May 2016, 11:50

It is a beautiful plane and you've done fantastic background research. Very impressive all around.

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:55 pm
by Fairblue
Postby archie » 26 May 2016, 14:06

That is good. It looks like a tiny aeroplane rather than a model, if you know what I mean!

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:55 pm
by Fairblue
Postby 266 » 26 May 2016, 22:22

Thank you. That's the ideal outcome!

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:55 pm
by Fairblue
Postby VickersVandal » 27 May 2016, 12:17

Oh jolly good show that man! :pilot2: :yay:

Excellent research, planning and execution. I am well impressed!


I also feel rather foolish for not spotting the Expeditor from the illustration. I am ashamed... :oops: :oops:

Re: Parkington Pacemaker

Posted: Mon Feb 11, 2019 1:57 pm
by Fairblue
Postby Mac50L » 28 May 2016, 05:45
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I made a mistake thinking it was an Electra, probably the first plane I ever flew in but, from Wiki, "The Model 18 can be mistaken for the larger Lockheed Electra series of airliners which closely resemble it."

Beech 18 - 9000+ built, first flight Jan 1937, Maximum speed: 225 mph (195 knots, 360 km/h), Range: 1,200 mi (1,000 NM, 1,900 km) at 160 mph (260 km/h), Capacity: 6 passengers.

The Swiss airforce used them so obvious, a Lichtenstein licence built version ???.

As for speed, they staged a race between one and a jet powered Mac truck at Oshkosh. It also looked quite spectacular, doing aerobatics at night, tailing flares etc. Sorry no night pictures but a couple of it doing aerobatics during the day.
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